I’ve been doing a “thing” for way too long. And the realization hit me - that I’ve been doing this “thing” - when I was on a recent call with my business coach and I was stressing out about my schedule. I went on and on to her about how I felt overwhelmed with all the things that filled up my calendar.


She’s such an effective coach that she sometimes doesn’t even need to say a word to get me to see what I’m doing, and this was one of those times. She nodded as I vented,, and I started to hear what I was saying. I suddenly realized that I was complaining about the schedule that I created, the things that I had said yes to, the way I had designed the days, hours, and minutes that made up my life. There was a single common denominator in all the stuff that was causing me anxiety and that thing was ME.


Facing this fact caused a huge shift.


First, I began to understand that I was giving my schedule the power. My schedule’s just my schedule; it really doesn’t deserve that level of responsibility. So I took the power back into my own hands. 


When I’m stressed out or facing temporary defeat, it’s easy for me to blame it on people, places, or circumstances. “I’m too busy!’ “Being a solopreneur is so hard!” “Nobody understands!” Or blame it on myself in a destructive way, which sounds something like “I suck, I’m not enough, I can’t do anything right.” All these strategies stink.


Once I owned up fully to being totally responsible for my life - the good, the bad, the awesome, and the ugly - a really cool thing happened. The overwhelm disappeared.


It’s not anyone or anything else’s fault that I don’t have time to go on a hike, or that I don’t get enough sleep, or that I can’t afford ___.” I got myself here, and if I don’t like it, I can get myself somewhere else. If it’s not working for me, I can change it!


I’ve been considering how my little epiphany could help those of you who struggle with prioritizing your health and fitness. Here’s what I came up with…


I keep close tabs on my thoughts, especially destructive ones. I do what one of my favorite scriptures says, which is take every thought captive. We don’t have control over some of our thoughts; they just pop up. But we do have control over what we do with that thought or where we allow it to go. I try really hard to let the useless thoughts float away and act on the thoughts that are constructive.


I keep the pressure on myself to keep my mind right on this matter, and I invite you to do the same.


When it comes to working out, what thoughts are running the show? What thoughts are getting in the way? Are you blaming your schedule like I was? Your job? Your kids? Your current lack of fitness?


If the circumstances of your life are prohibiting you from prioritizing your health and fitness, remember that you created those circumstances. Take back your power and I’m almost certain the overwhelm and the frustration will dissipate like it did for me.



Comment